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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 700 (some duplicates have been removed)
, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willin
happy while being in san francisco there is such an amazing attention to the environment. people are very environment conscious and i see community aggregations also to have renewable energy. it makes me very happy because in italy we have been following this path for a very long time. for example in the first six months of this year we installed photovoltaic panels larger than the united states all put together. it shows you the extent of the revolution happening. i am sure italian companies will be happy to work with the local institutions that have started to generate projects that will somehow go in that direction, and also we want to have parties and communication activities to show the people in the street that it is important to have sustainable behaviors and not to leave a carbon footprint behind us. >> [inaudible] >> yeah, if i understand correctly because -- you said about the innovation -- if we? >> [inaudible] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create sil
is that the environment is really changing rapidly. 10 years ago, if we had sat down and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people cou
it came from, but it is the type of environment that fosters creation. there is another benefit to being in this type of environment. lots of service providers, lots of other companies that are also starting businesses, whether you need legal assistance -- obviously, we have the lab space. recruiting is important for start-ups. staffing, exactly. so we have that as part of this innovation center. >> access to education and access to the right environment. >> yes, i would say so. >> ibm is a big company. i am sure there are a lot of people in the valley that still see it as an east coast-based company. the reality is you have been here for a long time. can you talk about the ontario culture here and what is being done that with the great ideas -- a entrepreneurial culture here and what is being done with the great ideas? >> we started here in 1962. this building is about 25 years old. we were down the hill at the san jose raiders center. -- research center. one of the things that ibm does -- a couple of things. one is having an eye on where things are going. one of the reasons that we foc
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it h
if any other recommendations that might have. >> the sbc encourages the department of the environment to pursue mobile redemption sisters, mobile redemption centers rotating basis could be a potential solution for the coming up next the city should resalute the geographic distribution of centers with the goal of expending them to parts of city underserve. additionally the geography of san francisco and density should provide policy rationale to increase the size of convenience zones in the city of san francisco. the sbc asks that the department of environment in coordination with others work with retailers so seek exemptions for small businesses. >> so can we just stop right here for the local? are there any comments, suggestions or modifications. >> we're is good. >> you have been extensive background, but the fee of $500 should be considered and the sbc encountryings courages the department of environment to bring that. >> we should do a little more investigation of the tiers of how much people would have to pay. >> i think that is a really good idea. >> right, because i defi
to working hand in glove with you to protect our environment and to add the to the port and as i was coming in here i saw all the signs of sustain ability and so i hope that we can look forward to another 40 years. >> thank you. oh, and one last thing -- >>> i'm sorry your time's up. >> hi i'm larry and i'm the spirit of jefferson street past. i have not been in active street arts for about ten, 12 years but for ten years from 1999 to 2,000, i'll spent more time there than i did at home you can ask my x wife she'll confirm that. and the reason i went back there is because i was appreciated there and i think the whof needs a balance and the restaurants, the chain stores and the individual proprietorships but there was something about the human contact and street artists that people genuinely appreciated and i would make custom work for people and i went home evidence feel like i had human contact with people and showed them a taste of our city that they are not going to find in their hometown and gov a dog at this exact site at the moment but it's an institution that you have to su
for people who do this, who care about the environment, and who care about things being reused. thank you. >> thank you. any other public comment? seeing none, public comment is closed. commissioners? commissioner dooley? >> we spent a lot of time on this at the outreach committee, and i really appreciate the draft that we have now, but i also thought since the superior markets are the ones that trigger these convenience zones, i was thinking that perhaps not only -- that we should not allow supermarkets that have existing recycling, if they change owners, to opt out. you know, that is what we're seeing more and more, a new owner comes in and they say oh, we're not doing that anymore. clearly, for a large supermarket, $100 a day is nothing. and they are going to be happy to opt-out. you know, we have a suggestion for a fee of $500, but i'm not even sure that that is enough for a safeway or a whole foods. perhaps they would be willing to pay $500. i think that i just think that i agree that we need to put this obligation back on those who have created the situation. , as much as we pos
people that are driving. it helps to protect the environment. so, it really helps to protect everybody. and that's really very important for us. one of the major roles the health department is having is analyzing the data. for example, we now have a geo database that's bringing in data from demographics, the way people drive, the density of people that are walking through different corridors of the city, and we're able to see by looking at that type of data that more than 50% of the fatal and severe injuries, pedestrian injuries occur in about 5% of the streets in san francisco. and you'll be hearing more about -- those will be the areas that will be more focused. , and so, i want to just thank you for your time. (applause) >> thanks, tomas. the public health lands that dph has brought to roadway safety has really, i think, made us all much better and it's going to make our programs a lot more effective. * lenz it's we're in the final stage of development. we're grateful to have them on board. having a strategy is good, but it's only good if we actually execute on it. and the people o
environment and lastly we looked how can we encourage private sector investment and new and the city can't do this on its own. we need to work with the private sector and leverage this and that could be look at programs to reduce the cost of and expand clean energy financing and with pace and other mechanisms, pursuing third party ownerships and partnerships to develop more renewable energy. levering caa and and to the fee and tariff and having this set of customers under cca and guaranteed off takers the renewable power for years to come you can assure to the developers there is the market to sell into and thereby help them to get financing and get projects on the ground and supporting clean investments. for example by working with the pension and retirement funds to use some portion of the portfolios to go towards these programs and demonstrations on public property and that's been started already on clean power sf. we have almost 40 members in total and it's a fantastic group and we're lucky to have knowledgeable folks and universities in the area and active community members so a very
that meander we do under a canopy of 0, redwood, pine, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, more women in the new congress including iraq war veteran tammy duckworth, then, -- outrage over a fatal gang rape of a woman in india, and declining birth rates in the u.s. ♪ >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, diversity in congress. the new congress is the most diverse ever with 20 women senators and 78 women in the house of representatives. the house democratic caucus has more women and people of color than it does white men, another historic first. we will explain what this means to you. but first we introduce you to one of those freshman. illinois democrat tammy duckworth, one of two female war veterans to be sworn in this week. the illinois democrat is the first double-amputee to serve in congress. the i
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud
the environment code to require owners of existing commercial buildings to allow their tenants to bring their bikes in. alternatively, if owners don't want to allow their tenants to bring their bikes in, they are required by the environment code to provide bicycle parking space. our proposed ordinance allows such attorneys owners to comply with the code. any property that has not complied with environment code by august, 1 2013 deadline they will be out of compliance and if this ordinance is adopted they would have to comply with the updated bicycle parking requirements as defined in this ordinance. finally, the zoning administrator would also be able to modify, waive and provide variances for bicycle parking under certain circumstances. in cases where off-street car parking is not provided. overall, no variance would be given when automobile parking exists, or proposed in the building. this concludes my presentation. we are pleased to present this to you today. this ordinance would help the city to satisfy the increasing need for bicycle infrastructure. sufficient bike parking would h
the environment, the through quality equipment, maintenance and training we operate our vessels and facility in his way that best protects the environment and employee and is rereduce the hazard doubts ways through recognized best management practices, blue and gold peer frean marine terminal and pier 49 were the first facilities certified clean and green by the city and county department of the environment. pier 41 is located in the heart of fisherman's whaf and is determine in about for the blue and gold vessels and ferries from tub bureau ron and sauce leet toe and angel likelihood dock at pier 41 and americanners can arrive from one distinguish nation and seemlessly transfer to a ferry for another and at peer 41 vessels can dock simultaneously and ensures that vessels depend and arrive on time shively and efficiently and this is important as a lot of passengers rely on the vessels for work. and there is an under ground 10,000-gallon fuel contagious critical in an emergency as we are able to store fuel there for ten days of continuous prayings in 2012, peer 41 is expected to generate $8.
of the environment is here as well (railroad noise). >> yes and all positive activities. the railway station is historic and it will remain that way, so again welcome to heron's head park. by the way for those of you who don't know why it's named this way is because if you ever have a chance to get above this area and see it literally is shaped like a heron's head and this is part of the honoring of our waterfront area. it's a great investment and of course it will lead me to say with the responsible, and this year is our proposition b which extends another great investment of $195 million to many other areas including the south east sector of open space that we got to take care of, and modernize. this is what rec and park does very well with dpw with all of the capital leadership in the city that i got to work on with the city administrator. we need to take care of the infrastructure in many ways and we are loving our parks and why we want this great investment to continue and this is another small yet important addition. we will have $35 million more of that with the connection with the
environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing
of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our travel modes as contribution to the detriment of the environment or to the detriment of our health as we all know the sun is by date getting madder at us and angle grier at us and we are getting fat. we got to do something about it. this is the time to do it. we have the best opportunity here with these f
health and safety and environment because we are discharging into the bay and into the ocean. this is essentially the first treatment here at our waste water treatment facility. what we do is slow down the water so that things either settle to the bottom or float to the top. you see we have a nice selection of things floating around there, things from bubble gum wrappers, toilet paper, whatever you dump down the toilet, whatever gets into our storm drains, that's what gets into our waste water treatment and we have to clean. >> see these chains here, this keeps scum from building up. >> on this end in the liquid end basically we're just trying to produce a good water product that doesn't negatively impact the receiving water so that we have recreation and no bad impact on fish and aquatic life. solids is what's happening. . >> by sludge, what exactly do you mean? is that the actual technical term? . >> it's a technical term and it's used in a lot of different ways, but this is organic sewage sludge. basically what it is is, oh, maybe things that come out of your garbage dispo
environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of photo volume takes. >> we have over 600 solar panels and three platforms on the building, and four integrated wind turbines. the wind turbines and the solar panels produce 7% of the building's energy. and we're reducing the use of energy here by 32% in the office building. >> the entire building is controlled by a complex computer system which monitors and adjusts air, heating and lights as well as indoor shades. >> the building is going to be a smart building. it's going to have all integrated f
do you want to do in this environment if you're an investor in the market? >> so depends on your starting position. if you have already taken on a lot of risks, you've done really well, and time now to trim it back. we have economic uncertainty, we have political uncertainty, and we have a certain amount of policy uncertainty coming out of europe. so take some trchips off the table, risk assets,ic quetities, higher bonds have done extremely well. if you are conservatively positioned, stay there because there is still value, not great value, prices have been artificially elevated. the most critical thing is keep an eye on the fed because the fed is the only thing that's keeping valuations above fundamentals. the f. the fed steps away, then valuations will come down. >> leave it there. mohamed, always good to have you on the program. thanks so much. >> my pleasure. thank you, maria. >> we'll see you soon. mohamed el erian joining us. >>> up next, we're "on the money" the, fiscal cliff deal is a raw one. why he says this country is going to hell. his quote, not mine. what he would d
haven't followed the mayor wanted name, but if you look at labor, the environment playing out that way, a variety of social and cultural issues is always, importantly health care you mentioned is always the same coalition for certain stability there and a huge overlap and that's a terrific thing. >> is this interesting paper we see as part of the larger process of reallocation between state and federal government. how much leeway to see up on that administration have? i don't find very -- that would be fine if you had 2 million dvd agents is better than we do have, but how much room does the lord gave you? >> i think what all their shows as federalism is alive and well is the real of 60 kind of wandered the concepts in our country for obvious reasons, but even that term now is coming to be embraced by newer generation of something positive because you see controversial issues as you identified the address of the state level. that's a good thing happening here. it's easy when you're middle-aged man like me to brood about. the rule of law, what are we going to do? but we've had a lot of
really it increased service to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my
is an ordinance authorizing the department of the environment to accept and expend a grant in the amount of $13,100,000 from the california public utilities commission, through pacific gas and electric company, to implement an energy use and demand reduction through energy efficiency program and amending ordinance no. 165-12 (annual salary ordinance, fys 2012-2013 and 2013-2014) to reflect the addition of five grant funded positions (fte) at the department of the environment, for a term from january 1, 2013, through december 31, 2014. >> thank you. we have i believe guillermo rodriguez from the department of environment on this item. and i believe you have an amendment. >> good morning, supervisors. yes, i do have an amendment i'd like it make on page 1 * to make on page 1. [speaker not understood]. line 8 numeral 5 should be changed to 3 in the bolded section. the 3 ftes that are mentioned, we are correcting that typo. >> if you can speak to the item. >> certainly. just a brief background. this is the fourth contract since 2003 continuing energy efficiency programs in san francisco. the funds
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 700 (some duplicates have been removed)